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Posts Tagged ‘plastic surgery safety’

While extreme plastic surgery makeovers (or multiple plastic surgery procedures at once) make for great television – they aren’t safe.  Prolonged (multi-hour, multi-procedure) surgeries place patients at greater risk of complications from anesthesia, bleeding, etc.  These ‘Mommy Makeovers’ sound like a good idea to patients – one surgery, less money and faster results – but the truth is – they just aren’t a good or safe idea.

Now an article by Laura Newman, [originally published  in Dermatol Surg. 2012;38:171-179] and re-posted at Medscape.com drives home that fact.

Combination Cosmetic Surgeries, General Anesthesia Drive AEs

February 9, 2012 — The use of general anesthesia, the performance of liposuction under general anesthesia, and a combination of surgical procedures significantly increase the risk for adverse events (AEs) in office-based surgery, according to reviews of statewide mandatory AE reporting in Florida and Alabama. More than two thirds of deaths and three quarters of hospital transfers were associated with cosmetic surgery performed under general anesthesia, according to an article published in the February issue of Dermatologic Surgery.

The study, derived from 10-year data from Florida and 6-year data from in Alabama, “confirms trends that have been previously identified in earlier analyses of this data,” write the authors, led by John Starling III, MD, from the Skin Cancer Center, Cincinnati, and the Department of Dermatology, University of Cincinnati, Ohio.

In a companion commentary, C. William Hanke, MD, from the Laser and Skin Surgery Center of Indiana, Indianapolis, presses for 3 patient safety practices: “(1) Keep the patient awake!… 2) Think twice before supporting a patient’s desire for liposuction that is to be done in conjunction with abdominoplasty under general anesthesia…. 3) “[B]e advocates for prospective, mandatory, verifiable adverse event reporting…[that] should include data from physician offices, ambulatory surgical centers, and hospitals to define and quantify problems that can be largely prevented and eliminated.”

The authors and editorialist are especially critical of liposuction performed under general anesthesia. The study revealed that although liposuction is perhaps one of the most common cosmetic surgical procedures, no deaths occurred in the setting of local anesthesia. “Liposuction under general anesthesia accounted for 32% of cosmetic procedure-related deaths and 22% of all cosmetic procedure-related complications,” the researchers write.

The researchers analyzed mandatory physician AE reports in ambulatory surgery submitted to their respective states, encompassing 10-year data in Florida and 6-year data in Alabama. A total of 309 AEs were reported during an office-based surgery during the 10-year period in Florida, including 46 deaths and 263 reportable complications or transfers to hospital. Cosmetic surgeries performed under general anesthesia accounted for the vast majority of deaths in Florida, with liposuction and abdominoplasty the most frequent procedures.

Six years’ worth of data from Alabama revealed 52 AEs, including 49 complications or hospital transfers and 3 deaths. General anesthesia was implicated in 89% of reported incidents; 42% were cosmetic surgeries. Pulmonary complications, including pulmonary emboli and pulmonary edema, were implicated in many deaths in both states.

Plastic surgeons were linked to nearly 45% of all reported complications in Florida and 42.3% in Alabama, write the researchers. Office accreditation, physician board certification, and hospital privileges all revealed no clear pattern.

One limitation acknowledged by the authors is that case logs of procedures performed under general and intravenous sedation are required in Florida, but are not public domain, and so were unavailable for analysis. In addition, investigators were not able to obtain data on the total number of liposuction procedures performed in either state. The lack of those data prevented them from calculating the overall fatality rate.

As readers of my previous publications know, the majority of surgeons I interviewed expressly do not perform multiple procedures during one surgery.  Also, many of them perform the majority of their procedures under conscious sedation with local anesthesia (which means you are awake, but you don’t care – and you don’t feel anything).

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In news out of Greensboro, North Carolina – another woman has been charged with several cases (dating back to 2007) of practicing medicine without a license.

Like the woman quoted in the article says, if you are going to a Motel 6 for a ‘medical procedure’ – what do you really expect?

This isn’t a way to skirt ‘the system’ or save money.. But it is a really good way to get hurt or killed.

Crimes of New York – another ‘butt-injecting’, superglue using phony kills patients in the Hispanic community in New York.

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Phoenix, Arizona –

In a case of criminal malpractice that sickens and horrifies health care personnel like myself – ‘self-proclaimed’ plastic surgeon, Peter Normann was able to delay sentencing after being found guilty earlier this summer in the deaths of three of his patients  – in three separate incidents.

The details of each of the cases are quite frightening, and highlight reasons why trained observers like myself are critical for objective and unbiased evaluations for potential patients.  In one case, another ‘homeopathic’ doctor working with Mr. Normann (not a licensed plastic surgeon) participated in a liposuction case that resulted in the death of a patient.  In two cases – patients died because Mr. Normann failed to intubate the patients correctly (and tore the esophagus of one of the patients.)

In all cases,  there was no intra-operative monitoring during cases – and Mr. Normann’s only assistant was a massage therapist (not an anesthesiologist, not a surgical nurse or trained surgical team.)  Horrifying – completely criminal, and unforgivable and unacceptable.

Additional Links on this case:

Homeopathy in Arizona covered for doctors’ mistakes

‘Homeopathic’ doctor kills patient performing liposuction.

The Times: Surgical Roulette

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this time in Los Angeles, where several individuals were posing as licensed physicians.  A sting operation was conducted after several patient complaints – and injuries.  The story in the Manila paper is here. The LA Times initially broke the story.

Notably, the clinic operators had posted fake degrees and credentials on the walls.  (This is why it’s important to independently verify credentials with state licensure boards).  Anyone with a scanner, and basic computer literacy can print up and fake any document they want..

I’ll keep posting these stories as a reminder for people to use credible sources for information about their doctors (such as well researched books like mine) or licensure boards.

(While most of the stories appear to originate in the United States I think this is probably just a result of our media interests – and what makes national and international headlines.  There are frauds everywhere, who just want people’s money – they don’t care if people get hurt or die in the process.

Unfortunately, many of these people operate for years before they get caught, if ever.

In international news, the need for investigation and medical scrutiny of medical tourism is becoming more and more apparent.  (I told you that Cartagena Surgery was a trendsetter.)  Now, if only we could translate that into book sales.

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