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Posts Tagged ‘Guide to medical tourism’

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Free pdf:

Mexicali! a mini-gem guide to surgery in Baja, California

The pdf has been uploaded to Google books, and several other sites.

Low-cost e-format:  I managed to work out a kindle format, but Amazon.com won’t allow independent publishers to offer our books for free (except as part of a limited trial on KDP select.)  However, I have received several emails specifically asking for the Mexicali book to be placed on Amazon.com – so I am reluctantly doing so.  Please note that this e-format version is priced at the minimum – of 99 cents with a free download trial period.  (In case you are wondering, Amazon.com collects 65% of that.)

Update:

Paperback book:  The paperback version of the Mexicali book is now available!  I had hoped to offer a color version (for fans of medical photography) but for small-run books, it was going to be 28.00 a book, which seems excessive to me.  I’ve priced it at just above the cost to produce and offer it on Amazon channels for less than 7.00.

 

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Back in Mexicali but just for a few days – as I pack up the apartment and get ready for my next journey – to Texas, of all places!

As I mentioned before, leaving Mexicali is hard – it’s a city, and a people who get under your skin.  I’ve lived (and traveled to) a lot of places, but this has been the most bittersweet of all.

In the meantime – I am (finally!) finishing up the last bit of editing  – with much help from friends –  for the Mexicali guide to surgical tourism book.   I hope to have it finished – and available on-line for downloads before the end of the year.

I’ll post links and directions for interested readers once it is ready.

Mexicalisign

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Well – this book has gone through the first-pass round of editing.. Now it’s on to the second step (another round of editing) before final formating and publishing.  As I’ve mentioned previously – I will be offering free pdf downloads at multiple outlets for interested readers.  (I would love to be able to offer it as an e-book but it costs quite a bit to have it professionally converted – and my previous efforts to convert books to electronic formats were exercises in extreme frustration.)

I wanted to take a minute to thank my additional content contributors:

Dr. Joanna Calzada, MD and Dr. Cuauhtemoc Cairo Robles.

Their assistance and contributions have been invaluable!  Dr. Calzada absolutely threw herself into helping me uncover the life and history of Mexicali – and as a second-generation Mexicali resident – her input was amazing.  We crisscrossed the city several times to get information to include in the book for our readers.

with Dr. Joanna Calzada, MD – book contributor (life & culture of Mexicali)

Dr. Robles, a professor of architecture at the Universidad Autonoma Baja California, and expert on Mexicali architecture was equally outstanding.  Not only did I use several of his publications as references and resources on public buildings – but Dr. Robles stepped right in to offer photographs, stories and local history on all of the amazing houses and other buildings I fell in love with (such as Mexicali’s Graceland.)

Lastly, special thanks to Elizabeth A. Warren – who is currently editing my book.  She is my former college roommate (and thus has been editing my writing intermittently over the last 18 years.)  She is also an English teacher in Memphis, Tennessee where we attended college together.

I felt quite the poor friend when I offered her the ‘opportunity’ to edit my book for free – (since I am budget less at the moment.)  But, as always – Libby was up for the challenge.  (Let’s home my improper use of grammar doesn’t get the best of her.)

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As a follow-up for all the overseasradio.com radio listeners (and all my loyal readers) I have posted some additional information on the topics covered during the radio program with Ilene Little from Traveling for Health.com including contact information for several of the physicians mentioned.

in the Operating Room at New Bocagrande Hospital

Thoracic Surgery

Esophageal cancer – during the segment we highlighted the importance of seeking surgical treatment for esophageal cancer at a high-volume center.  One of the centers we mentioned was the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center in Pittsburgh, PA – and the work of Dr. Benny Weksler, MD.

Dr. Benny Weksler*, MD

Hillman Cancer Center

5115 Centre Avenue

Pittsburgh, PA 15232

Phone: (412) 648-6271

He is an Associate Professor in Cardiothoracic Surgery and Chief of Thoracic Surgery at UPMC and the UPMC Cancer Center.  (For more information on Dr. Weksler, esophageal cancer, and issues in thoracic surgery – see my sister site, Cirugia de Torax.org)

(To schedule an appointment via UPMC on-line click here).

We also briefly mentioned Dr. Daniela Molena*, MD at John Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland.

The Johns Hopkins Hospital

600 N. Wolfe Street

Baltimore, MD 21287

Phone: 410-614-3891

Appointment Phone: 410-933-1233

(The link above will take readers to the John Hopkins site where they can also make an appointment.)

* I would like to note that I have not observed either of these physicians (Weksler or Molena) in the operating room.

We also talked about several of the thoracic surgeons that I have interviewed and observed numerous times, including both Dr. Rafael Beltran, MD & Dr. Ricardo Buitrago, MD at the National Cancer Institute in Bogotá, Colombia.  These guys are doing some pretty amazing work, on a daily basis – including surgery and research on the treatment of some very aggressive cancers.

in the operating room with Dr. Rafael Beltran

Dr. Rafael Beltran is the Director of the Thoracic Surgery division, and has published several papers on tracheal surgery.   He’s an amazing surgeon, but primarily speaks Spanish, but his colleague Dr. Buitrago (equally excellent) is fully fluent in English.

Now the National Institute website is in Spanish, but Dr. Buitrago is happy to help, and both he and Dr. Beltran welcome overseas patients.

Dr. Buitrago recently introduced RATS (robot assisted thoracic surgery) to the city of Bogotá.

Now, I’ve written about these two surgeons several times (including two books) after spending a lot of time with both of them during the months I lived and researched surgery in Bogotá, so I have included some links here to the on-line journal I kept while researching the Bogotá book.  It’s not as precise, detailed or as lengthy as the book content (more like a diary of my schedule while working on the book), but I thought readers might enjoy it.

In the Operating Room with Dr. Beltran

There are a lot of other great surgeons on the Bogotá website, and in the Bogotá book – even if they didn’t get mentioned on the show, so take a look around, if you are interested.

in the operating room with Dr. Ricardo Buitrago

Contact information:

Dr. Ricardo Buitrago, MD 

Email: buitago77us@yahoo.com

please put “medical tourist” or “overseas patient for thoracic surgery” in the subject line.

We talked about Dr. Carlos Ochoa, MD – the thoracic surgeon I am currently studying with here in Mexicali, MX.  I’ve posted all sorts of interviews and stories about working with him – here at Cartagena Surgery under the “Mexicali tab” and over at Cirugia de Torax.org as well.  (Full disclosure – I assisted Dr. Ochoa in writing some of the English content of his site.)

out from behind the camera with Dr. Ayala (left) and Dr. Carlos Ochoa

He is easily reached – either through the website, www.drcarlosochoa.com or by email at drcarlosochoa@yahoo.com.mx

HIPEC / Treatment for Advanced Abdominal Cancers

I don’t think I even got to mention Dr. Fernando Arias’ name on the program, but we did talk about HIPEC or intra-operative chemotherapy, so I have posted some links to give everyone a little more information about both.

HIPEC archives at Bogotá Surgery.org – listing of articles about HIPEC, and Dr. Arias.  (I recommend starting from oldest to most recent.)

Dr. Fernando Arias

Oncologic Surgeon at the Fundacion Santa Fe de Bogotá in Bogotá, Colombia.  You can either email him directly at farias00@hotmail.com or contact the International Patient Center at the hospital.  (The international patient center will help you arrange all of your appointments, travel, etc.)

Fundacion Santa Fe de Bogota

   www.fsfb.org.co

Ms. Ana Maria Gonzalez Rojas, RN

Chief of the International Services Department

Calle 119 No 7- 75

Bogota, Colombia

Tele: 603 0303 ext. 5895

ana.gonzalez@fsfb.org.co  or info@fsfb.org.co

Now – one thing I would like to caution people is that email communications are treated very differently in Mexico and Colombia, meaning that you may not get a response for a day or two.  (They treat it more like we treat regular postal mail.  If something is really important, people tend to use the phone/ text.)

Of course, I should probably include a link to the books over on Amazon.com – and remind readers that while the Mexicali ‘mini-book’ isn’t finished yet – when it is – I’ll have it available on-line for free pdf downloads.

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My first case this morning with another surgeon was cancelled – which was disappointing, but I still had a great day in the operating room with Dr.  Ham and Dr. Abril.  This time I was able to witness a bariatric surgery, so I could report back to all of you.

Dr. Ham (left) and Dr. Abril

I really enjoy their relaxed but detail oriented style – it makes for a very enjoyable case.  Today they performed a sleeve gastrectomy** so I am able to report – that they (Dr. Ham) oversewed the staple line (quite nicely, I might add).  If you’ve read any of the previous books, then you know that this is an important step to prevent suture line dehiscence leading to leakage of stomach contents into the abdomen (which can cause very serious complications.)  As I said – it’s an important step – but not one that every doctor I’ve witnessed always performed.   So I was a pleased as punch to see that these surgeons are as world-class and upstanding as everything I’d seen already suggested..

** as long time readers know, I am a devoted fan of the Roux-en-Y, but recent literature suggests that the sleeve gastrectomy is equally effective in the treatment of diabetes.. Of course – we’ll be watching the research for more information on this topic of debate. I hope further studies confirm these results since the sleeve gives patients just a little less of a drastic lifestyle change.. (still drastic but not shot glass sized drastic.)

Dr. Ham

They invited me to the show this evening – they are having several clowns (that are doctors, sort of Patch Adams types) on the show to talk about the health benefits of laughter.  Sounds like a lot of fun – but I thought I better catch up on my writing..

I’ll be back in the OR with Los Doctores again tomorrow..

Speaking of which – I wanted to pass along some information on the anesthesiologist for Dr. Molina’s cases since he did such a nice job with the conscious sedation yesterday.  (I’ve only watched him just yesterday – so I will need a few more encounters, but I wanted to mention Dr. Andres Garcia Gutierrez all the same.

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Interesting new article in the Montreal Gazette on medical tourism for Canadian citizens.  The article makes the point we discussed here on a recent post – that Canadian insurance should make the move to support medical tourism/ medical travel for Canadians due to cost and access issues.  Canadians, like Americans, face a myriad of issues when it comes to healthcare – lengthy waiting periods, increasing costs and difficulty obtaining ‘nonstandard treatments’ as mentioned in both these articles, citing the same patient..

In other medical tourism news, Michael Zey has published a new book talking about the future of healthcare, and medical tourism plays a large role in this, and cost containment.

Expect to see more pitches for Malaysia and medical tourism – the Malaysian government added additional financial incentives for hospitals there that cater to medical tourists.. Malaysia remains a fine option for Australians and others in the nearby vicinity – despite continued worries over the Indian superbug.

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As a former resident of Canada, and well as someone with several family members living in Canada – I would like to welcome my Canadian readers to the site. Since publishing my first book on medical tourism, I was told by multiple people, “Canadians will never be interested,” but as someone familiar with the Canadian healthcare system, I knew this not to be true.

There is a huge amount of national pride and Canadian identity tied up in their healthcare system – but this pride fails to address many of the problems endemic to the system itself.  All health care systems have problems, everywhere. It’s the nature of trying to address the needs of a growing, dynamic entity like a population of nation – a population that in many countries is sicker, and older with more chronic diseases than ever before.  It is inevitable that there will be shortfalls in some areas, and nothing for citizens to be ashamed of.

The most important thing is for the people to have access to care, where ever that care comes from, in a timely fashion.   For many years, it meant that Canadians slipped across the border to the United States for heart surgery, cancer treatments or other medical problems of a more urgent nature. But now, the USA’s health care system is spiralling out of control – making it imperitive that Canadians find another destination for those times when they just can’t (or don’t want to) wait.

In many cases, patients (from the USA) can go to Colombia, or other countries for medical tourism using their current insurance.  I’d like for my Canadian readers, insurance writers and medical tourism professionals now to chime in and let me know how it works for my friends to the North.

If insurance doesn’t currently pay for medical tourism – then push!! the insurance companies to do so. (It’s in their best interest for cost savings – so you might be surprised to hear what they have to say.) Insurance companies here in the USA were some of the earliest adoptors of medical tourism, first thru targeted pilot programs – and now with whole divisions set up to help patients go abroad for care.

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